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hunting in africa

hunting in africaservice, professional hunter, hunters, big game, free state, hunting areas, safari packages, safari lodge, african game lodges, outfitter, outfitters, fair chase hunts, sport hunter, taxidermy, ellisras, african currency, africa customs regulations, africa electricity, warthog, kudu, zebra, impala, steenbok, klipspringer, gemsbok, leopard, jackal, hartebeest, reedbuck, duiker, blesbok, eland, waterbuck, springbok, ostrich, bushbuck, nyala

 

Africa Hunting - Hunting Safaris in South Africa

Trophy Hunting in South Africa, African Hunt with Select Safaris

When planning your trophy hunting safari in Africa it is important to consider a few different aspects.
The intention is to be informative rather than present our services as superior to any other.


Suggestions when planning your trophy hunting safari

  • Trophy Hunting Area and Country
    Trophy hunting is offered by various companies in various countries on the African Continent. The country you choose will be determined by the species you are interested in pursuing as well as the ease with which the logistics around your hunting safari can be planned
  • Trophy Quality and Specifications
    Different areas in South Africa and in Africa presents different trophies, with different trains and habitat, Animals tend to grow in different ways. as Example areas like Limpopo Province in South Africa is well known for high quality Kudu trophies where in areas like Cape province the Kudu bulls tend to be smaller in horns.
  • Legislation
    Each province's nature conservation authority regulates its hunting industry, and legislation, for example, bow-hunting or handgun hunting may vary between provinces. But throughout South Africa, both hunting outfitters and professional hunters are licensed only after passing written and practical examinations. In addition, the safari company's facilities such as accommodation, sanitation and transportation are inspected in order to assure compliance with industry standards.

    In sum, the law says that it is the responsibility of the hunting outfitter:
    • to conclude a written and signed contract with the hunting client before the start of the safari in which daily rates, trophy fees, conditions of payment, and so on are established
    • to obtain all the documents and permits to hunt and subsequently remove and transport trophies from the area hunted.
    • to supply the necessary facilities for accommodation, meals, qualified staff, and transportation.
    • to assure that the trophies are correctly handled and dispatched
    • to market the safari company.

    Previously, professional hunters (PHs) were given examinations by the local nature conservation authorities. In 1990, due to the growing financial and time burden to license PHs, the industry was privatized. Now, potential PHs study and pass examinations in a private professional hunting school. A licensed professional hunter is responsible to:

    The object of the legislation is to provide protection to the foreign hunter in South Africa by setting standards that would be obligatory before a hunting outfitter or professional hunter is licensed. Legislation also provides for the maintenance of these standards once a license has been granted.

    Protect yourself and hunt with a professional who practices
    ethical methods and adheres to the standards set out.

  • Cities.
    The CITES regulations is an international agreement regarding trade regulations of endangered species and requires that Appendix I species (at present white rhino, leopard, etc.) have a special import permit from the hunter's country of residence before the trophy can be exported from the animal's country of origin. The necessary import permits must be obtained by the hunting client before departure on safari. As these regulations are constantly changing, it is recommended you check both with your Professional Hunter & Outfitter as well as the local wildlife authorities, prior to your safari for the latest listing of species that require such permits. Failure to do this could result in leaving your prized trophy in the land of it's origin. Unfortunately, even if a species can be legally hunted in Africa, the hunter's own country of residence might have regulations that prohibit import of the legally hunted trophy that South Africa cannot override.

    Schedule II species - or threatened but not endangered species will first be given an export permit in the animal's country of origin; subsequently, the hunter's country of origin will then grant an import license for that species.

    The most commonly hunted CITES I animals are: Elephant, White Rhino, Leopard, Cheetah, and Cape Mountain Zebra.
    Please note that there are many more animals on the
    CITES I appendix and you must request from your country the current list of animals on CITES I and CITES II appendices.

    CITES II commonly hunted animals are Lion, Crocodile, Bontebok, Blue Duiker, Hartmann's Zebra and most minor cats and all primates. All veterinary permits must be obtained by the outfitter before shipping either raw or mounted trophies.
    Veterinary and export permits are handled by most of our taxidermists who dip, pack and complete the paperwork in order to ship your trophies.

  • Budget:
    Some of Africa's most remote hunting areas can offer exceptional experiences, but the logistics involved in getting there and maintaining a well functioning hunting camp is often quite costly and as a result these safaris will tend to be more expensive.
  • Hunting Outfitter
    There are many fine hunting outfitters , but to get in contact with one of these which is able to propose a hunting safari in line with your specific requirements can often be a daunting task There are a great number of options and to this effect we will suggest you compare the offers of quite a few different outfitters.

 

Other Information.

Shot placement
Shot placement by far outweighs ballistics. with your rifle is vitally important but equally so is for the hunter to have a good knowledge of the animals vital organs and their positioning. The heart is generally set low and somewhat forward in the chest cavity.

To determine the position of the vital heart area on most African game, imagine a vertical line running up the back half of the front leg to the shoulder and another horizontal line dissecting this at a point approximately one quarter up the line of the belly/chest. This is accurately found when employing the use of a telescopic sight. It is well advised that the hunter get as close as possible to his quarry in order to take advantage of the larger target for accuracy and above all, maximum performance, penetration and effectiveness of the projectile.

When taking aim, reasonable compensation needs to be made if the animal is either quartering toward or away from the hunter.

When hunting big game and especially the traditional Big Five, the hunter is well advised to carefully consider where he actually places his "killing" shot.

Here are a few tips to ensure a clean kill.

• Aim at the target spot on the animal not just at the animal
• Be patient and check for obstructions in your line of fire
• Only hunt if your rifle or bow have been properly sighted in
• Always check for other animals hidden behind your target
• Head and neck shots are best left for the experienced hunter

Angles and stance of the target animal are of vital importance. The sportsman must diligently judge for himself and more often than not quickly, as to what degree he must compensate for these factors.

Patience and intelligent maneuvering must be employed to allow for the best full broadside or frontal image of the target animal. Make it a golden rule to chamber another round immediately after firing no matter what the outcome of the first shot and must become a reflex reaction without taking your eyes off the animal.

Head and neck shots are at best risky from an accuracy point of view. This is largely due to the fact that animals in general can move their heads and necks suddenly.
Make sure that there are no obstructions immediately in front of the rifle muzzle before firing as this could result in the projectile deflecting and result in a minor explosion causing fragments of perhaps wood or stone injuring the hunter.

The brain shot should be used only when the margin for error is reduced by close range and the sportsman is confident of his accuracy and competence. Employing this type of shot results in immediate death as well as no spoiling of the skin or meat but the disadvantages are the risk of missing the very small target and damage to the trophy head. The same applies to neck shots with the added disadvantage of possibly stunning or wounding the animal.

The heart or shoulder shot is strongly recommended because of the large target area where the vital organs are situated and damage to the cape and trophy head is minimal.

Beware = Buffalo + Elephant + Rhino

On these species a classical side or frontal brain shot can be considered but only if the position of the brain is well known to the hunter. The first well-placed shot is of utmost importance and it is well advised to trigger a second shot. Practice the habit of using "solid" or hard-nosed bullets on these thick-skinned animals. In the case of buffalo a "solid" is recommended for the second shot should the animal be mortally wounded. This will ensure maximum penetration of the projectile should the animal retreat or charge.

A shot placed too high or too low on an elephant's head will have no killing effect whatsoever. A low frontal shot to either side of the head may well hit that portion of the tusk within the skull, causing severe damage to the trophy and extreme fury on the part of the animal. With the exception of the elephant and hippo head or neck shots are not recommended.

Contact Details

Contact and Booking Information

Hunting & Booking Information
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Additional Contact Information

Tel: +27 14 763 6447
Mobile: +27 82 896 3187

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USA CONSULTANT
Jim Molinari
Tel: 831 758 6152
Mobile: 831 261 4648
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210 Kipling Street | Salinas | California | 93901